Scam

Easy Canvas Prints

If you’ve seen deals from Easy Canvas Prints that look just too darn good for a large canvas print, then you might just be onto something. As it turns out, Easy Canvas Prints’ terms of service allows the company to use photos you upload “in advertising, marketing, samples, and promotional materials.” [click to continue…]

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Nasiv Mansurov has a great article that sheds some light on yet another bait and switch photo retailer operation.  I know everyone wants to find the best deals on camera gear, and folks are having a hard time finding popular gear in stock since the Japan earthquake earlier this year.  However, Nasiv’s investigation into AjRicard.com (aka scam shop) after his buddy ordered a 5D Mark II from the site should serve as a reminder that “if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” [click to continue…]

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Uncle Earle

As a follow-up to the buzzing story from earlier in the week, a California woman has come forward with a rather convincing claim that her Uncle Earl Brooks shot the $200 million+ Ansel Adams negatives in 1923.

She has original prints in her possession that are strikingly similar to negatives from the Ansel Adams garage sale collection.

[KTVU via CNN]

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The New York Attorney General has busted these scam shops for their nefarious bait & switch tactics, which result in heartache stories across the photography community year in and out.

While they’re getting off with a $765,000 settlement after being investigated by the New York AG, hopefully the officials will keep a closer eye on them.  This isn’t the first time Broadway Photo has been on the wrong side of the law though.

[New York Times via @AdoramaUsed]

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