Legal

As a guy was recording protests in Taksim Square in Istanbul, Turkey with what appears to be a DJI Phantom quadcopter and GoPro camera, police shot it out of the air.  [click to continue…]

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Picture Defense

PictureDefense.com is a website that is designed to help photographers take action to have their stolen images removed from the infringing websites hosting such images. The site was created by Jimmy Beltz from PhotoTips.biz and I think he’s done a bang up job on walking us through sending out proper DMCA letters to protect our images. [click to continue…]

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RED v Sony

Here’s some damages you don’t see in your everyday lawsuit… RED is asking a court to have existing Sony cameras destroyed.

RED brought the lawsuit today in federal court against Sony due to the technology inside of Sony’s F65, F55 and F5 cinema cameras – claiming that it infringes on two of RED’s patents. RED is asking the court to force Sony to stop making and selling the cameras and that Sony should surrender all profits derived from the previous sale of the cameras.

Additionally, RED asks the court to force Sony “to deliver up and destroy all infringing cameras.” Ouch. [click to continue…]

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After the uproar from users everywhere over Instagram’s repugnant terms of service update, the mobile imaging service finally backtracked on the update and reverted the offending advertising section back to the language under its prior terms of service. [click to continue…]

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Not only does this video win the cheesy award, but the advice it gives to the target audience (apparently those with drastically reduced IQs) flags warning signs for things both pro and amateur photographers do on a daily basis.

Not really what we need the government telling us right now given the current attitude of law enforcement to photographers in public spaces.

[via Chase Jarvis]

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Just, wow.

I’m all for catching the bad guys out there, but this goes too far. As you can see in the above video, the guy who recorded police in public was charged with eavesdropping and faced up to 75 years in jail.  He won the initial case – the local judge dismissed it, citing that the Illinois law was unconstitutional (this should be a complete no-brainer here).

The Illinois legislature and attorney general are apparently idiots though, because the case is being appealed in an effort overturn the lower court’s dismissal.  [click to continue…]

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