How to Shoot and Edit a Hyperlapse with Your DSLR

In this video from Cal Thomson, he shows you how to create a hyperlaspe using a DSLR and tripod. The hyperlapse effect was recently made popular as an application from Instagram. The mobile Hyperlapse app takes care of the image stabilization automatically.

In order to stabilize a hyperlapse you have created from your DSLR, however, you have to perform stabilization in post production using tools like warp stabilizer in After Effects, which Thomson covers in the above video.

How to Shoot Timelapse on the Canon 7D Mark II

One of the great new features on the Canon 7D Mark II is the ability to shoot timelapse photos without the need for the overpriced Canon TC-80N3, which was required on prior Canon pro and prosumer DSLRs if you wanted to shoot in interval mode.

However, when the Canon 7D Mark II was initially announced, there was some confusion about its timelapse capabilities because some of the initial specs and documentation referenced that it could be programmed to capture photos in intervals between 1 and 99 images. That would suck and be pretty much a pointless feature since a second of video footage from a timelapse would contain at least 24 images (e.g., 1080p video at 24fps).  [Read more…]

How to Remove Noise in Photoshop

In the above video, Photoshop Principal Product Manager Bryan O’Neil Hughes shares how to remove noise in Photoshop. He highlights the use of the noise removal tools in Camera Raw, as well as hiding other noise by turning down the black levels.

The same controls are also available in Lightroom, so that portion of the tutorial applies to Lightroom as well. Additionally, you can use the image size and Smart Sharpen tools within Photoshop to combat noise.

Understanding the Basics of Low Light Photography

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There are times when you have to use a flash when shooting a wedding or portrait session. For example, if you are shooting outside and the sun has gone down completely, or if you are shooting inside with dim overhead lighting, a flash is a necessity. But whenever I can avoid it, I prefer taking advantage of natural light, even if it is waning in the half hour after sunset.

To get the most out of your camera, follow these guidelines: [Read more…]

How to Fix Red Skin in Photoshop

Here’s another great, quick Photoshop tutorial from Phlearn on correcting red skin that commonly shows up on subjects’ faces around the nose and cheek areas.

You can use a Hue & Saturation adjustment layer to first isolate the specific red areas that you are trying to correct and then adjust the hue to blend in with the surrounding skin areas.

[via PetaPixel]