shutter speed

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The following is from HDR Photography | A 3 DVD Comprehensive Guide to HDR Photography by SLR Lounge. We cover bracketed HDR, in-camera HDR, single-shot faux HDR, single-shot bracketed HDR, panoramic HDR and more! (more info).

What is a “Stop” of Light?

The concept of a “stop” of light is probably the most important concepts in photography, yet it’s widely misunderstood. In this article, we want to take you back to the basics to help visualize a stop of light and changes in exposure.

A stop of light is not a quantifiable unit of light entering the camera but rather a relative one. Therefore, increasing by one stop doubles the amount of light let into the camera while decreasing by one stop cuts the amount of light in half. [click to continue…]

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In our last Photography Basics article, we took a look into the basic principles of aperture and lens speed.  We learned that the aperture of a lens is a critical component to a properly exposed photograph and powerful composition tool.  In this article we are going to examine the fundamentals of shutter speed and how it will affect your images.

Hopefully, we will also be able to answer that frequently asked question . . . why are my photos so blurry? Frequently, the culprit is our shutter speed. [click to continue…]

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This video of the Canon 1D Mark IV firing at 10 frames per second is mostly pointless; however, I still find myself watching it over and over thanks to the gadget nut in me.

Looks a little grainy, doesn’t it?  That’s because it was shot at ISO 25600 on a Nikon D3S.  A single overhead tungsten bulb supplied the light.

Stay tuned for more serious content on both of these new work horses.  In the mean time, watch the video again. ;-)

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Take the plunge by The artist (formerly) known as Gene

Shot with a Canon EOS 30D at 1/250th of second.

Last week, I touched on using motion blur to give a sense of speed and movement in a photo.  This week, we’re going to look at some examples where no motion blur (or very little) is present; however, these images still manage to effectively convey a sense of motion.

In each image, there is some element that helps convey motion.  In some images, it may be the primary subject that should be moving.  In others, it may be an element surrounding the subject – such as water.  By freezing what should be moving, these images give your mind a moment that you know and can sense requires motion. [click to continue…]

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