Eye-Fi 16GB Pro X2 Card Announced

Eye-Fi 16GB Pro X2

Eye-Fi has unveiled a new 16GB Pro X2 SD card, which also sports a Class 10 designation. As you may know, Eye-Fi cards allow you to wirelessly transmit your images from your camera to your computer, tablet or smartphone over a WiFi network.  The Pro X2 cards also allow transfer of RAW files and can be configured to free up space after photos have transferred off the card.

The new 16GB Pro X2 cards run $99.99 and are available here at Amazon.  Additionally, Eye-Fi dropped the price on 8GB Pro X2 cards to $79.99 to make room for the 16GB models at the top of the food chain.

 

Don’t Buy Anything Less Than a Class 10 SD Card

No More Slow Memory Cards

I’ve seen a lot of deals lately on Class 4 and Class 6 SD cards mixed in with deals on Class 10 SD cards.  The price difference between these classes of SD cards is now nominal and, as a result, there’s really  no reason you should buy a Class 4 SD card anymore.

The prevalence of this problem came to light recently when a friend brought his Canon 60D to me, stating that it wouldn’t record video for more than a couple of seconds.  My gut told me to check the SD card first thing.  And, sure enough, he had an old SanDisk Ultra Class 4 SDHC card in it.  I swapped it out with one of my SanDisk Class 10 SDHC cards and it worked like a charm.

He ordered a new Class 10 SDHC card that day.  His 60D has captured video just fine ever since.

If you don’t already know, the Class-ratings on SD cards relate to a minimum write speed. When recording HD video, you need a minimum-sustained write speed in order to dump the data off the camera and onto the card.  In many cameras today, Class 4 (4MB/s) and Class 6 (6MB/s) cards just can’t handle the data transfers.

Class 10 cards are currently the fastest rated for minimum write speeds available and will handle video capture for most, if not all, current HD video DSLRs and camcorders today.

If you want to know more about SD card speed ratings and classifications, check out my article on Demystifying SD Cards.

If you want an easy recommendation, go with SanDisk Extreme Class 10 SD cards.

SanDisk Extreme Pro UHS-I SD Card in the Nikon D7000

The Nikon D7000 is the first DSLR to take advantage of the new UHS-I SD card specification.  Unfortunately though, it doesn’t appear to take full advantage of that speed potential.  The Nikon D7000’s buffer seems to cap at 10 frames during continuous high speed shooting no matter which SD card is inserted.

I got my hands on the latest SanDisk Extreme Pro UHS-I SDHC cards, which are due out in March, to see just how well they worked in this first-generation UHS-I camera.

While the difference between the SanDisk Extreme and Extreme Pro SD cards is marginal in the D7000, there is still an obvious difference.  After capturing the full complement of 10 frames at the D7000’s max frame rate of 6fps, the D7000 delivered the following results with each of the cards. [Read more…]