patent

Sigma 24-105mm f4-2

We are finally seeing results from a lawsuit that Nikon filed against Sigma in May 2011. A judgment was issued against Sigma last month in Tokyo District court, which awarded 1.5 billion Yen to Nikon (close to $15M USD).

The dispute centers a number of Sigma lenses using vibration reduction technology. Nikon originally sought the equivalent of close to $150M USD; however, the judgment stated that the damages was equivalent to 15% of the profits of the violating products earned by Sigma, cutting damages down from the max profits of 10.1 billion Yen.

This has to be quite the blow to Sigma. The company has been a roll lately with awesome lenses like the 24-105mm f/4 OS and 18-35mm f/1.8 lenses. Hopefully, Sigma’s operations won’t be negatively affected in a manner that would delay future lens releases and Sigma’s momentum will continue to gain traction as a solid third-party lens maker.

[via Nikon Rumors]

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Nikon has filed a patent that makes way for a digital back to convert 35mm film SLRs into the full-fledged DSLRs. The rear door that covers the film holder would be removed and replaced with a digital back equipped with an image sensor.

An excerpt from the patent:

The camera back exchange type camera which images the object image acquired by the photographing optical system by the side of a camera body, and obtains electronic image data is known by replacing with the rear lid with which the camera body was equipped, and equipping a camera body with the camera back having an image sensor.

In the camera back of the description to this Patent document 1, when the moving mechanism to which the position of an image sensor is moved, and the position detection sensor which detects the position of an image sensor are provided and a moving mechanism moves an image sensor based on the output of a position detection sensor, The image sensor to the photographing optical system by the side of a camera body is positioned.

Are you ready to convert your Nikon F6 yet? [click to continue…]

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Canon-24-70mm

A recent patent publication shows Canon has been looking into adding image stabilization to a 24-70mm f/2.8 lens.  Given the recent announcement of the EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM lens (which still isn’t available), however, this doesn’t bode well for an IS version anytime soon.

Of course, there’s a Tamron lens that fills this void though

[via Photo Rumors]

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Canon 70-300mm Lens

Canon applied for a patent application on a 70-300mm f/4-5.6 lens in March 2011.  Presumably, this is an update to the consumer grade line of 75-300mm non-IS lenses.  There’s no mention of image stabilization in the patent; however, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it couldn’t be an IS lens.

These are the current consumer zoom models in this range:

The other line of thought is that a new 70-300mm f/4-5.6 lens with image stabilization could replace the existing mid-grade lens as a cheaper/lower model. [click to continue…]

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Canon Touchscreen and WiFi DSLR

A recently-published Canon patent application, which was filed in April 2011, elaborates on the DSLR touchscreen features in a similar application published in 2009.  The application focuses on the operation of the touchscreen [click to continue…]

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Canon 70-300mm Lens

Canon applied for a patent on a 70-300mm f/4-5.6 lens in March 2011. Presumably, this is an update to the consumer grade line of 75-300mm non-stabilized lenses. [click to continue…]

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