Watch This Stunning Timelapse of Scenes in Paris

Paul Richardson spent three weeks in Paris recently and tried to capture the city’s classic sights as well as the modern business side. While he captured some fantastic scenes, his editing really made this timelapse stand out.

He spent three weeks shooting, followed by 5 weeks of editing the images and footage for a grand total of about 400 hours on this project. That is 2.5 hours for every second of this video, which was entirely self-funded and shot purely out of his love for timelapse.

He shot the video using a Canon 6D, EF 17-40mm f/4 lens, 50mm f/1.8 lens and 70-200mm f/4 L lens. He used a homemade dolly coupled to an eMotimo TB3 for the motion control sequences.

I’m pretty sure that I said “holy crap” out loud at the 1:10-1:20 mark on my first time through. Solid work Paul.

You can find Paul here on his Facebook page.

Kessler CineDrive Released

Kessler CineDrive

Kessler has announced pre-sale dates for its new CineDrive motion control system.  CineDrive features multi-axis control over camera movements and allows you to fully configure key frames, bezier curves and precision positioning for your time lapses, stop-motion or live action shoots.

The basic kit will be less than $6000 and will include a Kessler CineDrive Brain, two motor bricks plus hardware to configure as a pan/tilt head and a slider motor.  An iOS app for the CineDrive system is in the works for the release (or soon thereafter) and an Android app will be available in the future.

Pre-sale orders will begin at 1 PM ET on Wednesday, August 29. The sale will be limited to 25 orders at a first-come first-served basis to US customers only and with a one CineDrive system per customer limit. A second batch of CineDrive systems should be available in 1-3 months.

More details available on the Kessler CineDrive website.

‘Altissimo’ Timelapse Created from Over 45,000 Images

‘Altissimo’ (above) is Patryk Kizny’s latest slider-induced creation, showing off the beautiful Swiss Alps. iOS users can see it here.

The timelapse was assembled from more then 45,000 single frames, which consumed more than 700GB of storage space.  Kizny and his team used motion-control sliders from DitoGear, which let you set the pace of the slider’s movement over time and get that smooth motion effect when edited together.

You may remember the last video from Kizny featured here – the HDR Chapel.