Sigma Ordered to Pay Nikon 1.5 Billion Yen for VR Patent Infringement

Sigma 24-105mm f4-2

We are finally seeing results from a lawsuit that Nikon filed against Sigma in May 2011. A judgment was issued against Sigma last month in Tokyo District court, which awarded 1.5 billion Yen to Nikon (close to $15M USD).

The dispute centers a number of Sigma lenses using vibration reduction technology. Nikon originally sought the equivalent of close to $150M USD; however, the judgment stated that the damages was equivalent to 15% of the profits of the violating products earned by Sigma, cutting damages down from the max profits of 10.1 billion Yen.

This has to be quite the blow to Sigma. The company has been a roll lately with awesome lenses like the 24-105mm f/4 OS and 18-35mm f/1.8 lenses. Hopefully, Sigma’s operations won’t be negatively affected in a manner that would delay future lens releases and Sigma’s momentum will continue to gain traction as a solid third-party lens maker.

[via Nikon Rumors]

Possible Class Action Suit for Frustrated Nikon D600 Customers Churning

Nikon D600

We are all well aware of the sensor dust spot complaints generated by Nikon D600 users. Nikon has yet to acknowledge a problem with the D600 . . . even though it launched a Nikon D610 with the only real upgrade being an improved shutter. In a service advisory about the D600 sensor dust problem, Nikon simply stated that the problem was “generally attributed to the natural accumulation of dust.” Recently, some customers have even received Nikon D610 units as their “fix” for a problematic D600 model sent in for a sensor cleaning.

US law firm Lieff Cabraser has posted an inquiry form soliciting information from Nikon D600 customers, which cites the D600 as an allegedly defective product and notes further that consumer protection laws may afford D600 customers an opportunity to bring a class action suit against Nikon for their troubles.  [Read more...]

PictureDefense.com Holds Your Hand to Help You Remove Stolen Images

Picture Defense

PictureDefense.com is a website that is designed to help photographers take action to have their stolen images removed from the infringing websites hosting such images. The site was created by Jimmy Beltz from PhotoTips.biz and I think he’s done a bang up job on walking us through sending out proper DMCA letters to protect our images. [Read more...]

Alaska Photography Laws

This post attempts to highlight Alaska laws that may be relevant to photographers (please read disclaimer below).  It is part of my ongoing effort to catalog the various state laws relating to photography.  You can see more on the main photography laws page.  If you are aware of other significant Alaska statutes or cases that relate to photographers’ rights or duties, please use the contact form to pass them along. [Read more...]

Detained for “Photography” by Maryland Transit Police

Train fanatic Christopher Fussell was shooting photos and video of Baltimore’s light rail train when he was stopped and detained by Maryland Transit Police.  The police insisted that it was illegal to take photos and video of the transit system telling him that he “need[s] to cease and desist with the photographing and continue on your way.” [Read more...]

Homeland Security Bulletin on Photographers and Federal Buildings

The US Department of Homeland Security issued an “Information Bulletin” concerning “Photographing the Exterior of Federal Facilities” last year.  The New York Times passed along the bulletin last week when it obtained a redacted version. [Read more...]