iso test

Samsung NX10

The Samsung NX10 is the one of the new kids on the hybrid camera block.  Like Micro Four Thirds cameras from Panasonic and Olympus, the NX10 features a DSLR-sized sensor, but offers full time live view and no optical viewfinder (but rather an electronic viewfinder).

However, the Samsung NX10 features a larger sensor than the Micro Four Thirds cameras.  In fact, the NX10′s imaging sensor is about the same physical size as the one found in the Canon Rebel T2i.

As part of my upcoming review of the Samsung NX10, I decided to pit the NX10 against the Canon Rebel T2i to see how the noise control holds up.  [click to continue…]

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Canon G11 ISO Test

by on October 30, 2009

in Canon

The Canon G11 is the latest in a long line of solid compact cameras.  One of the big buzz features about the G11 was Canon’s decision to drop from 14.7-megapixels in the G10 down to 10-megapixels in the G11.  It finally seems like the marketing department has listened a bit to the cries from the prosumer audience who say that more megapixels is not necessarily the answer.  Canon has embraced the growing voice of critics with the launch of the G11 stating, “You asked, and Canon not only listened, but delivered big-time.”  So, does Canon deliver big-time in the noise department with the G11? [click to continue…]

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A couple of years ago, after Canon announced the 40D, Nikon dropped a bomb with the D300 and D3 combo.  I remember the cover of Popular Photography read in bold print “Nikon Strikes Back.”  That was a very fitting description in the face of what many thought was a rather mild upgrade to the Canon 30D, which was in turn a mild upgrade to the 20D.   A year later, Canon failed to really “wow” us with the 50D; however, I found the 50D to be an excellent performer.

Fast forward to Summer 2009 and the stage is set for both Nikon and Canon to take another turn at “wowing” us.  The D300s is mostly a rehash of the D300, along with video capture.  Canon, however, stepped out with the feature-packed 7D, which also featured video, but added a spec-list that made it look like a 5D Mark II Jr.

Since the introduction of the D300 was Nikon’s turn to “Strike Back,” will the Canon 7D, in response to the D300s, be “Return of the Jedi Canon”?  Keep on reading this first round of comparisons, which takes a side-by-side look at the ISO performance of these two prosumer cameras. [click to continue…]

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Olympus E-P1

The Olympus E-P1 has captured a lot of buzz.  The initial impressions seem to be quite promising for the new Micro Four Thirds camera.

I have been using the Olympus E-P1 for a little while now.  While you can expect a full review of this new camera soon, below you will find my results from a quick ISO test shoot on a tripod in a tungsten lit room, with white balance set to tungsten and exposure set via Program mode. [click to continue…]

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The Sony A330 is one of the new entry-level Sony Alpha DSLRs, replacing the revolutionary A300.  The standout feature in the A300 and A330 is the fast-autofocus Live View display.  One step behind this awesome feature is the fact that the screen articulates.  These features are solid and, frankly speaking, put Nikon and Canon’s efforts of Live View in a DSLR to shame.

However, fancy features mean nothing if image quality is not up to snuff.  In today’s digital imaging world, a big component of overall image quality focuses on low light performance – and that means clean images at high ISO.  The Sony A330 and A300′s max sensitivity setting is at ISO 3200, while the Canon Rebel T1i and Nikon D5000 cover the sensitivity range up to ISO 12800 and ISO 6400, respectively.  Sony’s A700 has a max sensitivity up to ISO 6400. [click to continue…]

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