ge

GE Digital Cameras looks to be adding Micro Four Thirds to its growing lineup of cameras.  If a report from CNet Asia is accurate, we could see GE-branded Micro Four Thirds cameras by the end of the year.

For those unfamiliar with GE Digital Cameras, General Imaging Company is actually the company that makes and sells GE Digital Cameras subject to a brand-licensing agreement with General Electric (the company that owns the ‘GE’ trademark).  Obviously, General Electric has at least some marginal oversight of the products and the use of its brand, but the actual company that is making and selling the cameras is a camera company. [click to continue…]

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GE unveiled its refreshed line of point and shoot cameras at CES 2011.  Additionally, GE added the DV1, a pocket camcorder, to its lineup. [click to continue…]

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GE has released 9 new point and shoot cameras touting at least 9 megapixels and featuring bells and whistles such as a touch screen LCD, panoramic shooting modes and a waterproof version.  The cameras have a very “me too” kind of feel in an industry that is crowded with multiple models from the big, established companies.  Sorry, but nothing really makes them stand out from the huge crowd.  Additional details are below. [click to continue…]

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While Amazon has been selling GE cameras for some time now, GE has now made the entire line available through Amazon’s Electronics Store.  The line includes the 2008 models, including the entry-level A series, the mid-price E series, and the ultra-compact G series. Standard colors for the GE cameras are black, silver or red, with some models being available in additional colors as well. Prices start under $90.  You can view the GE line on Amazon by clicking here.

The GE cameras feature blink and smile detection, which allow the user to capture just the right moment for people snapshots. After a shot is taken, the blink detection feature alerts the user that the subject’s eyes were closed and allows another attempt. The smile detection feature works like Sony’s Smile Shutter on the Sony W170 (hands-on here) by tripping the shutter automatically when the subject smiles.

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