Sony Digital Imaging “like no other” Foam City Commercial

Sony UK has just released its new “images like.no.other” commercial from Foam City, Miami. In case you missed it, check out Photography Bay’s coverage of the Foam City shoot and some background info on the inspiration. As promised, here’s the brand spanking new commercial for your viewing pleasure:

You can see a higher resolution version at http://sony.co.uk/images.

Ashton Kutcher in New Nikon COOLPIX Camera Ad Campaign

I enjoy seeing how camera makers choose market their products, even more so after Sony’s Foam City. To that end, enjoy Nikon’s new commercial above and check out the full details on the ad campaign from Nikon in the below press release.

If you want to get your hands on the Nikon COOLPIX cameras featured in the Ashton Kutcher commercial, you can go to the best-selling Nikon COOLPIX cameras at Amazon.com by clicking here: Nikon COOLPIX Digital Cameras

NEW YORK (March 25, 2008) – Hollywood’s A-list actor and producer, Ashton Kutcher, is lending his photogenic qualities to Nikon to promote the manufacturer’s new COOLPIX Style series cameras. The campaign will debut nationally on March 25th with a television commercial, which precedes the print advertisements and an interactive online component. Nikon selected Kutcher for the campaign to bring brand relevance to a broader and more youthful audience. Taking place in trendy locales such as boutique hotels and upscale shopping destinations, the campaign highlights the exquisite styling, fashionable colors, simplicity and great performance of Nikon’s Style series compact digital cameras.

“Ashton is the perfect choice for this campaign as he embodies both the stylish and fun attributes of Nikon’s COOLPIX Style series cameras,” said Lisa Baxt, senior communications manager for Nikon Inc. “Ashton’s collaborative spirit, creativity and approachable personality enhanced our campaign which showcases the great style, sleek colorful design and ease of use of Nikon’s newest COOLPIX Style series cameras.”

“I am thrilled to work with Nikon on this campaign,” said Kutcher. “I think technology today represents so much more than just function – it represents personal style and sophistication. I’m enjoying the opportunity to work with such a well respected brand and a group of highly creative individuals on a campaign that showcases the style, design and simplicity of the new COOLPIX cameras.”

The television campaign spots, directed by Emmy award winner Brian Buckley, have Kutcher’s COOLPIX camera being discretely taken and passed around by numerous adoring fans who take several pictures with it before slipping it back into Ashton’s pocket. Ashton then notices some surprising pictures when he reviews the photos on his camera’s LCD screen. The print campaign, shot by legendary photographer Norman Jean Roy, truly captures the sophisticated yet playful essence of Ashton and the aesthetics of the camera. Following the television and print advertisements, the campaign will come full circle with a uniquely engaging internet component, details of which will be revealed shortly.

10 Tips for Breaking into Commercial Magazine Photography

The following post on commercial magazine photography is by Atlanta based photographer Zach Matthews. Learn more about him at the end of this post.

Every amateur photographer who’s ever flipped through a magazine has shared the same fleeting thought:  I could do this.  I am this good.  And who’s to say that’s wrong?  With the advent of digital image-making, cameras have become not just tools to record and describe, but tools that teach. The mean of photographic quality has skyrocketed in recent years, as a casual perusal of Flickr or a photography hobbyists’ board will immediately illustrate.  What, then, is holding amateur photographers back?  Why aren’t they selling images to magazines and commercial clients?  Why aren’t you?

The difference between a working professional and a dedicated amateur is fairly minimal these days, and it has a lot more to do with business decision-making than talent or equipment.  A number of important differences jump immediately to mind, however.  The way I see it, there are two types of professionals: full time, and everyone else (and by that, I mean you, too).  The full-time professional starves his way to the top.  Typically a full-time pro goes to photography school, where he learns darkroom techniques, film chemistry, light physics, and the hard, cold reality of living paycheck to paycheck for decades.  Most full-time pro photographers share one thing in common: they’re broke.  But not all.  A sizable population of working professionals make a living at photography, and they do it with the same business acumen necessary to operate as any entrepreneur.  They set up a shop, build a client list, hire employees, and above all, they shoot their tails off.

Full-time pros of my acquaintance in the outdoor photography world spend as much as 40 weeks a year in the field.  In my business, that’s in far-flung locations, involving international travel, injections, passports, broken gear, and hard deadlines.  It isn’t an easy job, and it’s a long climb to the top, but eventually these pros tend to top out and make a respectable living.

There’s only one problem: chances are, this isn’t you.  Full-time professional photographers won’t be reading this article; they know the route to success, they are logging their hours as we speak, and they’re aware of the rules of the game.  But here’s the question: would you really want to be a full-time pro?  What if you could have all the benefits, including international travel (for money), access to the best locations (for money) and the respect and praise of your peers, sometimes even for money, all while keeping your day job?  It’s not a bad option, is it? [Read more...]