Photographers

This is an interesting story of a man who has had his image stolen from his Flickr account and used thousands of times.

What would you do?

[via FStoppers]

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Yuri Arcurs is one of the worlds’ top stock photographers – and he’s got the studio to show for it.

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Digital photo-realist artist extraordinaire, Bert Monroy, spent the past 4 years cooking up this masterpiece of Times Square that serves as a tribute to the “who’s who” in the world of digital imaging.

The flattened image is 6.52GB and was built with almost 3,000 individual Photoshop and Illustrator files.  The image is zoomable on his site if you want to get closer up to personalities like Russel Brown, John Knoll and Scott Kelby (among many others) within the image.

The finished image will be on display at Photoshop World in Orlando, Florida from March 30 to April 1, 2011.

[via John Nack]

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Photographer Alfred Zhao captured this 272 gigapixel image of the Shanghai skyline using the GigaPan EPIC Pro and a Canon 7D with a 400mm f/5.6 lens and 2x teleconverter attached.  He was setup and started shooting at around 8:30am and after 12,000 images were in the bag, it was just before dusk.  It took months to complete image and get the final 1.09TB file uploaded.

Just how big is a 272 gigapixel image?  1 gigapixel = 1000 megapixels = 1 billion pixels.  That’s 272 BILLION pixels.  Printed at standard resolution, this image would cover over 7000 billboards.

But now it’s done and Zhao holds a world record for the largest digital photo.  There’s no time to rest though, as Zhao says, “This is not the end of my panorama journey, it is a new start, challenging the limit is an infinite process. New records will appear in the future, it is only a matter of time.”

Full details in the press release below. [click to continue…]

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During the snow storm in NYC a few days ago, Jamie Stuart grabbed his Canon 7D, a tripod and a heavy coat, then headed out into the elements to capture what Roger Ebert says “deserves to win the Academy Award for best live-action short subject. (1) Because of its wonderful quality. (2) Because of its role as homage. It is directly inspired by Dziga Vertov’s 1929 silent classic “Man With a Movie Camera.” (3) Because it represents an almost unbelievable technical proficiency.”

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