Nikon Next-Gen Rumors: D4 and D800

As we saw with the announcement of the Nikon D3s, it looks like Nikon intends to squeeze as much as possible out of that 12.1-megapixel FX format sensor . . . for good reason though, it’s an awesome sensor that has been producing great images for over 2 years now.

Rumors of succeeding models to the popular D3 (which saw a recent refresh with the D3s) and D700 bodies have been floating around for several months.  Rumors of the D800 or a D700x seemed to gain momentum after Nikon announced the top-end D3x.  Many expected to see a high-megapixel equivalent of the D700, which came roughly 9 months after after the D3.  Since its introduction, the D700 has been characterized as sort of a “Nikon D3, Jr.” [Read more...]

Nikon D3s Hands-On Review

The Nikon D3s is the successor to the Nikon D3. The camera is not much of a change from the previous model except for higher ISO settings and the addition of a new video mode. Nikon users will still appreciate that much of their beloved D3 has not been touched and that this camera is still meant for its intended audience. Sports shooters and photojournalists alike will very much so enjoy the capabilities offered to them on this camera.

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Hands-on: Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 85mm F3.5G ED VR


The Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 85mm F3.5G ED VR that was recently announced received some fondling by me at this year’s Photo Plus. If you’re a Nikon shooter, you will appreciate quite a bit of the design, weight and engineering that went into the lens. Seemingly targeted more towards the lower-end prosumer audience, Nikon D300s users especially will love this lens. [Read more...]

Nikon D300s Review

Nikon D300s

The Nikon D300s is a 12.3-megapixel DSLR that can also capture video at 720p resolution and 24 frames per second.  The D300s is a follow up to the D300 and serves as more of a refreshed version of the D300 as opposed to a totally new product.  It has most of same components and features as the D300 with a few new bells and whistles thrown in for good measure.

Since the recent announcement of the D3s, Nikon appears content in offering video capture at 720p for this generation of cameras.  All of the Nikon DSLRs that offer video only allow a maximum resolution capture of 720p at 24 fps.  Canon has stepped out of the box from its initial video limitations in the 5D Mark II by offering serious firmware updates to it (and promising more to come) and additional video options to its other new DSLRs like the Canon 7D, which offers 1080p HD video capture at 30fps, 25fps, and 24fps, as well as 720p HD video at 60fps and 50fps.  While Nikon has received much criticism on the video limitations of its recent DSLRs, it has shown no signs of stepping up the game in this generation of cameras.

That said, the Nikon D300s (and every other DSLR for that matter) is first and foremost a still image capture device.  Sure, video is relevant nowadays; however, performance for still image capture and quality is still our golden measuring stick.  With this in mind, let’s take a brief look at the key features and jump into the rest of this review. [Read more...]

Nikon D800 Before Christmas?

A tipster has sent in some info on the rumored Nikon D800 that he purports originates with a “very reliable source.”  According to the tipster, Nikon will not be revising the D700 for a “S” model, as was the case with the D300 and D3.

Instead, Nikon will release a completely new model to replace the D700 – the D800.

Rumored Nikon D800 features from the tipster include the following:

1) Video mode 1080p video recording (full HD)
2) High resolution 24.5 MP.
3) High frame rate: 7 fps without battery grip (similar to D300s)
4) 51-area Nikon Multi-CAM 3500FX (same technology as D3X)

He also tells me that the D800 will launch before Christmas.

I can’t confirm the veracity of this info or the reliability of the tipster yet.  I am reaching out to him for further details in hopes to substantiate these rumors. Keep in mind that these D700x/D800 rumors have been rattling around for over a year now.

Stay tuned for updates on the D800 or whatever else Nikon decides to throw at us.