Legal

Train fanatic Christopher Fussell was shooting photos and video of Baltimore’s light rail train when he was stopped and detained by Maryland Transit Police.  The police insisted that it was illegal to take photos and video of the transit system telling him that he “need[s] to cease and desist with the photographing and continue on your way.” [click to continue…]

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The above video from Libertarian website Reason.com takes a look into the legal standing for police to stop and arrest photographers for photographing or filming in public areas.

[Reason via PetaPixel]

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Rolling Stone points out photographers’ dilemma going on right now with regard to photographing Lady Gaga’s concerts.  In order to be permitted to shoot the concert, some photographers are required to sign an egregious rights-grab photo release.

There are a couple of provisions that are simply ridiculous from the photographers’ standpoint. [click to continue…]

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As seen in the above video, Marlon Kautz, an Atlanta man attempting to document police activity, had his cameraphone seized after he refused to stop filming them in a public place. Those police officers then deleted the photos/video of the police activity.

In addition to the $40,000 in damages the City is paying to Kautz to avoid a civil rights lawsuit, the Atlanta Police Department is adopting new operating procedures that prohibit police from interfering with citizens who are recording police activity.

It’s nice to see official police procedures catching up with the First Amendment, eh?

[via PetaPixel and AJC]

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The US Department of Homeland Security issued an “Information Bulletin” concerning “Photographing the Exterior of Federal Facilities” last year.  The New York Times passed along the bulletin last week when it obtained a redacted version. [click to continue…]

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