Quick Portrait Breakdown: From Beach Snapshot to Framed Canvas

Portrait-Breakdown-Beach-Pic

Anyone who has gone to the beach with the family understands the pressure on the photographer in the family to capture the perfect portrait on the beach.

It’s not like there aren’t enough things to worry about between hitting the lighting at the right time, to timing your shot in between random beach walkers to keeping sand out of your camera bag. On top of normal photographer thoughts, there is the challenge of working with your own kids, grandkids, nieces or nephews who don’t see you as a photographer but as dad/mom/grandpa/grandma/uncle/aunt with a dorky habit of carrying a camera. [Read more…]

 

How to Shoot and Edit a Hyperlapse with Your DSLR

In this video from Cal Thomson, he shows you how to create a hyperlaspe using a DSLR and tripod. The hyperlapse effect was recently made popular as an application from Instagram. The mobile Hyperlapse app takes care of the image stabilization automatically.

In order to stabilize a hyperlapse you have created from your DSLR, however, you have to perform stabilization in post production using tools like warp stabilizer in After Effects, which Thomson covers in the above video.

How to Shoot Timelapse on the Canon 7D Mark II

One of the great new features on the Canon 7D Mark II is the ability to shoot timelapse photos without the need for the overpriced Canon TC-80N3, which was required on prior Canon pro and prosumer DSLRs if you wanted to shoot in interval mode.

However, when the Canon 7D Mark II was initially announced, there was some confusion about its timelapse capabilities because some of the initial specs and documentation referenced that it could be programmed to capture photos in intervals between 1 and 99 images. That would suck and be pretty much a pointless feature since a second of video footage from a timelapse would contain at least 24 images (e.g., 1080p video at 24fps).  [Read more…]

How to Light an Amazing Portrait with a Low Cost DIY Lighting Kit

Phlearn is back with a great lighting tutorial using a cheap DIY light setup that costs less than $50. More importantly, Aaron Nace breaks down how to use the lights to get a certain look. He goes further to show his camera’s settings for the shots and how to work with your subject to get the best possible portrait with this setup.

The lights he mentions in the above video can be found currently for $15.99 each here on Amazon.com.