Google+ Goes RAW; Better Conversion Now Supports Over 70 Cameras . . . Look Out Adobe!

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Google+ added improved RAW file to JPEG conversion for over 70 cameras (including new cameras like the Nikon D800 and Nikon 1 J3). Additionally, you can always access your RAW files from the cloud if you need the original on a local drive.

I think this is a big, dang deal. While everyone is stirring for an Adobe competitor to come out of the woodwork with a perpetual license alternative to Photoshop, Google is quietly sneaking up with its acquisition of Nik and just continues to nudge out releases of photo editing, archive and sharing support via Google+. [Read more...]

Verizon FiOS Gives Photographers Some Wicked Fast Upload Speed

Photography often focuses on the camera, the lens, the artist’s eye—all very important. But there’s also the photographer’s technology infrastructure that is critical to his or her success and efficiency.

FiOS Internet

Today, digital photographers (amateurs or professionals) constantly share large files via their websites, e-mail, and social networks and these basic tasks require fast, reliable upload and download speeds. Typically, people focus on download speeds when selecting their internet service provider, but photographers should pay close attention to the upload speed. In fact, photographers opting for pure fiber to the home services, like Verizon FiOS, can share their work with clients, colleagues, and prospective customers up to 200% faster than is possible with cable internet. FiOS Internet boasts more bandwidth and faster speeds and is far more reliable than cable competitors (based on claims from Verizon). [Read more...]

Kodak’s Final Notice

Kodak is dishing out final notices (I just got mine) on their online gallery storage.  Not that it really matters to me.  I use SmugMug and Flickr for sharing my images online.  I have occasionally ordered a few snapshots or Christmas cards from Kodak; however, I will just upload the pics that I need at the time and get my pics or cards printed out. Perhaps some folks use Kodak’s service as their online storage solution.  If you do, then you’ll have to keep ordering products in order to keep your photos online. [Read more...]

Photoree: Bookmarking Reaches Images

You have StumbleUpon for websites and Last.fm for music, but the choices for bookmarking and recommending photos are much slimmer. Photoree is an opportunity to see thousands of photographs — to see what images other photographers are creating.

The system is very simple: just like with other recommendation sites, you create a profile and note a few photos that you like from the Photoree colection. From there, Photoree recommends photos that match your taste. You can browse through photos, create your own personal collection and even use the Creative Commons images that you find through the site.

Photoree has also simplified sharing photos. While there are quite a few sites dedicated to sharing photos you’ve taken with your friends and family, there are few options for passing along a photo someone else took but that you enjoy. Your options are pretty much limited to pasty an unwieldy URL into an email. Photoree offers options for sharing photos easily with your contacts.

Shutterfly’s New Share Sites

Shutterfly has added to its photo sharing and printing services by launching Share Sites. Share Sites provides users with a personalized web site to share photos with friends and family — a virtual photo album.

Share Sites offers up better designs than similar sites have offered in the past, as well as a very simple user interface. Someone with very little online experience can navigate these photo albums, if not create one themselves. With Share Sites, Shutterfly is not precisely competing with Flickr or Photobucket. Instead, their efforts compete with Kodak and Snapfish.

Despite the ease of use, Share Sites does have some potential for more advanced users — especially those who often work with clients, friends and family who aren’t up to speed with online photo options.

Flickr Makes Geotagging Easier

Flickr has made it easier for photographers to geotag images uploaded to the photo-sharing site. If you take a look at your photos on Flickr, there is a new option in the Additional Information section, labeled “Add to your map.”

Click on that link and you can mark where your photo was taken on a map, direct from Yahoo! Maps. Not my first choice on mapping options, but considering Yahoo! owns both, it isn’t a surprise. It looks like there is an element of feedback from the photos folks tag on Flickr and Yahoo! Maps. According to the Flickr blog:

As the odds are you know more about your local neighborhoods than we
do, when you edit a location on the pop-up map you can also see other
nearby options and choose one. Over time if everyone continuously tells
us we’ve got somewhere wrong, we can feed it back into the system and
update it for everyone else.