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The camera you own has one main lens and produces a flat, two-dimensional photograph, whether you hold it in your hand or view it on your computer screen. On the other hand, a camera with two lenses (or two cameras placed apart from each other) can take more interesting 3-D photos.

But what if your digital camera saw the world through thousands of tiny lenses, each a miniature camera unto itself” You’d get a 2-D photo, but you’d also get something potentially more valuable: an electronic “depth map” containing the distance from the camera to every object in the picture, a kind of super 3-D.

Stanford electronics researchers, lead by electrical engineering Professor Abbas El Gamal, are developing such a camera, built around their “multi-aperture image sensor.” They’ve shrunk the pixels on the sensor to 0.7 microns, several times smaller than pixels in standard digital cameras. They’ve grouped the pixels in arrays of 256 pixels each, and they’re preparing to place a tiny lens atop each array.

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This is a solid collection of resources from Traffikd. Everything from plugins and extensions to uploading and search tools to playing sodoku with Flickr pictures of hamsters.

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If you’re not a Flickr fan, then you might want to have a gander at Photography Bay’s 7 Alternatives to Flickr or our list of 45 Photo Sharing Sites.

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Xerox (NYSE: XRX) seems to have a problem with a healthy respect for photographers copyrights. Namely, if you are a student, they want yours.

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Chinese Antelope/Train Photo

Earlier this week, Xinhua, China’s state-run news agency, issued a public apology for publishing a doctored photograph of Tibetan wildlife frolicking near a high-speed train. The deception has brought on a big debate.

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So you’re interested in portrait photography, and you want to know what separates snapshots from art? Check out these 8 vitally important concepts from Eric Hamilton for creating better portraits — including lighting, subject, focus, background, composition, texture, color, and exposure.

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Are you looking for magazines that might publish your photos? This article gives you some good hints which mag might be the best for you.

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