Adobe Camera Raw 8.4 Release Candidate Now Available

by on February 22, 2014

in Adobe,Photoshop

Camera Raw 8.4

Adobe has announced a release candidate for Camera Raw 8.4, which adds support to several new cameras listed below.

(*) Denotes preliminary support. 

Additionally, Camera Raw 8.4 adds a new preview method for better before/after image comparisons. Fuji X-Series users will also be pleased to learn that Fuji X-Trans sensors receive an improved set of color matching profiles. Note that Camera Raw 8.4 for CS6 only includes updated camera and lens profile support as part of the recent Camera Raw policy change.

You can download the release candidates at the following links from Adobe Labs:

Remember, these are release candidates, which means they’ve been pretty well tested and Adobe thinks they are ready for full release; however, it’s recommended that you keep production work to prior versions until the official releases drop.  Expect those to come soon though.  Release candidates mean that the final versions are just around the corner.

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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

1 forkboy1965 February 22, 2014 at 6:09 pm

Wow.

I just read the link you handily provided regarding the Camera Raw policy change.

I’m a bit confused by it… so if I purchase a new camera in the future my version of CS6 will likely support the RAW file, but not handle some of the editing features? Am I reading that correctly?

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2 Eric Reagan February 23, 2014 at 12:42 am

Yes. That’s right. Camera Raw for CS6 will continue to add new cameras for perpetual license users. Only Camera Raw for CC will get new “features.”

Sarbanes Oxley’s accounting rules prevents Adobe from adding new features for “free” to CS6 users. It’s screwed up, but I did the research on that and Adobe’s not blowing sunshine on it. Thank your congressman.

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3 forkboy1965 February 23, 2014 at 11:38 am

I’m not an expert, but I’m wondering if this has less to do with SOX and more to do with the way Adobe has been accounting for revenue with perpetual license products.

When I installed iOS 7 to my iPhone (upgrading from 6) I didn’t pay any fee. Nor have I paid any fees for updating to Maverick on my laptop which includes new features over Mountain Lion (with the newer OS offering Pages and Numbers for free, which sounds like new features).

I suspect that at the heart of this is a difference in the way Adobe and Apple (and I’m picking on Apple since I use their products as well) account for revenue with perhaps Apple deferring some of it to future periods with the understanding it will account for improvements to products/services already sold.

I further suspect Adobe’s route has more to do with trying to get as many customers off their perpetual license products (like my CS 6 and Lr 5) and into CC as they anticipate it will be more profitable for them. No more customers sitting on a release for years before upgrading. No more (hopefully) pirating of software. And a potentially more reliable revenue stream.

But I’m just guessing here.

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