If You Breathe on Your Lens, It Will Die?

by on December 8, 2012

in Lenses

Raise your hand if you ever fog up your lens with your breath to clean it off… (I know I’m very guilty.)

Ok, so maybe it won’t kill your lens. According to Nikon though, there are acids in breath that can damage lens coatings. Instead, Nikon recommends via its support site to use a blower bulb, then brush, and wipe the lens with a lint free cloth.

How do I clean the camera lens?

The best way to clean a lens is to use a piece of lint free lens cleaning tissue and a small amount of Lens Cleaning solution. Do not use anything containing abrasives or  solvents, only use Lens Cleaning Solution.

First we recommend taking a small blower brush to blow off or brush away loose dust or debris.

Next, place a drop or two of cleaner on the tissue (never directly onto the lens) and then wipe the lens in a circular motion, beginning in the center and working your way outward, removing any marks or smear.

If the above supplies are not available a clean, dry, soft, lint free cloth can be used to clean the lens. Do not breathe on the lens to fog it for cleaning. There are harmful acids in breath that can damage lens coatings. Just use the blower bulb, then brush, and wipe the lens in a circular spiral from the center outward.

The same method can be used to clean the viewfinder eyepiece of Nikon cameras

Now, if only we could get a straight answer on the D600 dust issue…

[via PetaPixel]

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{ 5 comments }

1 Andrés December 8, 2012 at 10:44 am

What about LensPens?

2 Tim L December 8, 2012 at 12:41 pm

Another reason to use a high end filter on the front of the lens…

3 Jean-Pierre JARS December 14, 2012 at 5:53 am

Is human breath so acid ?
I would recommend use of water vapor such as : 1) let camera outside for a while when outside is less cooler than inside . Take camera inside and wipe with special piece of cloth to wipe windows, mainly those looking like small towels . They are very gentle to surfaces and catch very well all grease better with some humidity .
2) Otherwise, you can put water to boil and approch camera enough to get vapor on the lens and then wipe .
In summer , you can put camera into the fridge for few minutes and do as (1)said above .

4 Todd January 4, 2013 at 10:12 am

What about liquid lens cleaners? I’m not talking about window cleaner but the kind of cleaner made for coated optics? I have used those for a while now and have not noticed any difference between my older lenses and my newest ones. They all look and perform great.

5 somantaba January 4, 2013 at 10:33 pm

Good idea for not able to voutch for coating, I have used W German lenses be it schniender,Rodenstock or Carl Ziess on both medium or large format and blowing them with breath, well none of these didn’t have any problem of acids nor they ever developed fungus, even the smaller format lenses in 35mm of the Nikon of the year 1986 are doing well. It is the cost of manufacturing that makes them compete making substandard products later blame the customers for neglect.

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