Ready for HDR Video? It’s Coming in the AMP Camera

by on June 25, 2011

in Video

While HDR photography has its fans and foes, HDR video is likely to fuel the fire even further if the tech in the AMP video camera becomes widespread and affordable.

The AMP camera claims to offer up to 17 stops of dynamic range as the result of capturing simultaneous video on 3 separate senors – with each set to different exposure values.  The Gen II AMP camera stores raw data to SSD hard drives and, based on the company’s FAQ, it looks like they are working on increasing the memory buffer for longer recording times.

Check out the demo video below that shows off some of the footage and explains some of how the camera works.

What do you think?

[AMP via PetaPixel]

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{ 6 comments }

1 Jonathan Bergqvist June 25, 2011 at 1:07 pm

I’ve never liked the look of tone mapped HDR so for me its not very appealing footage.

2 Albert June 25, 2011 at 1:53 pm

Ditto on what Jonathan has stated. They should have focused on the merits of true HDR as opposed to promoting the heck out of tone mapping.

On another note, the promo video turned me off half way in. Too many titles, jump cuts, bland techno music, and… tone mapping.

3 Shane June 26, 2011 at 1:49 am

Great idea but hard to watch a video that over promotes itself and show’s you very little for such a long promo.

4 chad June 26, 2011 at 2:51 am

I think RED has already come up with a much better approach to increased dynamic range for video. Check out Vincent Laforet’s blog and see what I mean.

5 Lavasi July 1, 2011 at 5:24 am

If the end result looks exactly like the promo, forget it! It’s soooo ugly! HDR is to extend the dynamic range closer to what the eye can see naturally, without memory effect.

6 Dean July 1, 2011 at 5:08 pm

The problem with this camera is that it produces video that does not resemble what the human eye sees. So, all of it looks manipulated. And all of the overlapped video looks, oddly, flatter than other video. And, most situations do not have total range going from totally black to totally white. And if they do, the dp should shoot in another way to eliminate this demand from his shot. What shot DEMANDS–for its validity–total whites to total blacks? My eyes have NEVER seen such, because lighting works in specific ways, given the lighting source. Although some mathematics may EXPLAIN nature, no mathematics DETERMINES nature, algorithm writers!

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